Genetics, we are told, provides much of that we might or might not face in health issues during our lives.  If our parents or grandparents suffered cancer-related issues, for example, we might face the same fate, particularly later in life.

My father died in an industrial accident at age 29, which I was nine months old, so whatever illnesses he might have suffered later in life are undetermined.  My paternal grandmother lived to age 99 and had an active life past 90. My mother suffered respiratory issues late in her life but was cancer-free with one exception — skin cancer.

I have chronic bronchitis, which can hit when I have a cold or flu but most of my aches and pains at age 71 come from a rambunctious lifestyle that has led to broken bones and related injuries.

I do, however, also suffer skin cancer, probably from spending too much time in the sun with parts of my skin exposed to the ultra-violet rays.  Six years ago, doctors discovered basil cell skin cancer at the base of my neck.  Removing it left a six-inch scar.

On Monday, another doctor took out a hunk of cancerous skin on the right side of my nose and cut out another still undetermined growth on my lower left arm, among other things, at Carilion Clinic at Riverside One in Roanoke.  I will cover Circuit Court for the Floyd Press Tuesday with a bandaged face, another bandage on my arm with a good supply of pain killers on hand.

Fortunately, that is my only assignment on Tuesday, along with a town council meeting Wednesday, and I can rest up before photographing Fourth of July activities on Thursday and other things on the weekend.  My face is never a pretty one and it will look even worse for a few days.

A little research Monday evening found that skin cancer on a nose is not unusual.  Actor Hugh Jackman has undergone six surgeries to remove cancerous growths on his nose over the years and he’s a lot younger.